Researcher Database

Naoki HOSHI
School of Fisheries Sciences Training Ship “Oshoro-maru”
Associate Professor

Researcher Profile and Settings

Affiliation

  • School of Fisheries Sciences Training Ship “Oshoro-maru”

Job Title

  • Associate Professor

J-Global ID

Research Areas

  • Aerospace, marine, and maritime Engineering / Marine and maritime engineering

Academic & Professional Experience

  • - 2009/03 Fisheries Agency(Chartered ) Fisheries Inspection vessel Capitan

Research Activities

Published Papers

  • Mozammal Hoque, Kimitaka Kawamura, Osamu Seki, Naoki Hoshi
    MARINE CHEMISTRY 172 1 - 11 0304-4203 2015/05 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    To better understand the sources and atmospheric processing of organic aerosols in the remote marine atmosphere, aerosol (TSP) samples were collected over the North Pacific (13 degrees 14'N-53 degrees 37'N and 140 degrees 46'E-179 degrees 54' W) in May-July, 2010 during a cruise of T/V Oshoro Maru, and studied for dicarboxylic acids (C-2-C-11), omega-oxoacids, pyruvic acid and alpha-dicarbonyls as well as organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon and total nitrogen. Over the North Pacific, diacids are most abundant followed by omega-oxoacids and alpha-dicarbonyls. Although the molecular compositions of diacids are generally characterized by the predominance of oxalic (C-2) acid, we found a predominance of succinic (C-4) acid in four samples, which were collected in the central northern North Pacific. We consider that photochemical degradation of unsaturated fatty adds emitted from the ocean surface is the main source of C-4 over the central northern North Pacific, where Chlorophyll-a maximized during the cruise. Moreover, seven samples collected in the central northern North and western North Pacific shows predominance of malonic (C-3) acid over C-4, suggesting the photochemical degradation of C-4 to C-3. Spatial distributions of diacids, omega-oxoacids and alpha-dicarbonyls together with total carbon and water soluble total nitrogen contents showed higher abundances in the coastal western North Pacific followed by the central northern North and subtropical Pacific, signifying that continental aerosols are transported long distances to the remote marine atmosphere. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Keiko Sekiguchi, Hiroji Onishi, Hiroko Sasaki, Shota Haba, Yuka Iwahara, Daisuke Mizuguchi, Mayuko Otsuki, Daisuke Saijo, Bungo Nishizawa, Hirona Mizuno, Naoki Hoshi, Takehiko Kamito
    MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE 30 (3) 1199 - 1209 0824-0469 2014/07 [Refereed][Not invited]
  • K. Muramatsu, J. Yamamoto, T. Abe, K. Sekiguchi, N. Hoshi, Y. Sakurai
    MARINE BIOLOGY 160 (5) 1171 - 1175 0025-3162 2013/05 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    Using powerful jet propulsion, some squid species are able to exit the water and become airborne; this is a common behavior seen throughout the world's oceans. However, direct scientific observation is rare, with most studies relying on anecdotal evidence and limited photographic documentation. Here, we examine the flying behavior of young oceanic squid (Ommastrephidae) observed in sequential photographs taken in the Northwest Pacific (35(o)34.0'N, 146(o)19.3'E) on July 25, 2011. We define four phases in the flight process: launching, jetting, gliding and diving. During flight, squid actively change their aerial posture and attitude depending on the flight phase and their distance from the water. The present study demonstrated that flight of squid is not simple gliding after incidental exit from the water, but involves jet propulsion, generation of lift force and control of different body postures in different flight phases, which have evolved to enhance escape from predators.
  • K. Muramatsu, J. Yamamoto, T. Abe, K. Sekiguchi, N. Hoshi, Y. Sakurai
    MARINE BIOLOGY 160 (5) 1171 - 1175 0025-3162 2013/05 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    Using powerful jet propulsion, some squid species are able to exit the water and become airborne; this is a common behavior seen throughout the world's oceans. However, direct scientific observation is rare, with most studies relying on anecdotal evidence and limited photographic documentation. Here, we examine the flying behavior of young oceanic squid (Ommastrephidae) observed in sequential photographs taken in the Northwest Pacific (35(o)34.0'N, 146(o)19.3'E) on July 25, 2011. We define four phases in the flight process: launching, jetting, gliding and diving. During flight, squid actively change their aerial posture and attitude depending on the flight phase and their distance from the water. The present study demonstrated that flight of squid is not simple gliding after incidental exit from the water, but involves jet propulsion, generation of lift force and control of different body postures in different flight phases, which have evolved to enhance escape from predators.

MISC

Educational Activities

Teaching Experience

  • Introduction to Oceanography
    開講年度 : 2018
    課程区分 : 学士課程
    開講学部 : 水産学部
    キーワード : 海底地形、海洋大循環、熱/物質循環、プランクトン、海底資源、海洋観測、海洋法、海洋生物資源の保全


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