Researcher Database

Teppei J. Yasunari
Arctic Research Center
Assistant Professor

Researcher Profile and Settings

Affiliation

  • Arctic Research Center

Job Title

  • Assistant Professor

Degree

  • Ph.D. (Earth System Science)(Hokkaido University)
  • Master (Geoscience)(Hokkaido University)
  • Bachelor (Science and Technology)(Hirosaki University)

URL

Research funding number

  • 70506782

ORCID ID

J-Global ID

Profile

Research Interests

  • health impact   snow darkening   PM2.5   air pollution   Siberia   Asian dust (Kosa)   glacier   biomass burning   wildfire   Arctic   Climate model   Land surface model   Snow model   GCM   snow albedo   deposition   meteorology   dust   black carbon   成層圏物質   雪氷圏   気候   大気循環   アイスコア   エアロゾル   Troposphere   Stratosphere   Ice Core   Climate   Aerosol   

Research Areas

  • Natural sciences / Human geoscience / hazard
  • Environmental science/Agricultural science / Environmental dynamics
  • Natural sciences / Atmospheric and hydrospheric science
  • Environmental science/Agricultural science / Environmental impact assessment

Academic & Professional Experience

  • 2019/07 - Today Hokkaido University Global Station for Arctic Research, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE) (Dual Appointment) Assistant Professor
  • 2019/04 - Today Hokkaido University Center for Natural Hazards Research Secondary Joint Appointment
  • 2019/04 - Today Hokkaido University Arctic Research Center Assistant Professor
  • 2017/04 - 2019/03 Hokkaido University Arctic Research Center Secondary Joint Appointment
  • 2015/07 - 2019/03 Hokkaido University Faculty of Engineering Assistant Professor
  • 2011/05 - 2015/06 GESTAR/USRA (Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research, Universities Space Research Association) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Staff Scientist
  • 2009/05 - 2011/05 GEST/UMBC (Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, University of Maryland Baltimore County) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Visiting Research Associate
  • 2009/04 - 2009/04 Kyoto University Graduate School of Science, Division of Earth and Planetary Science Assistant Research Staff
  • 2008/04 - 2009/03 Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) Research Department Researcher
  • 2007/04 - 2008/03 Hokkaido University Institute of Low Temperature Science Research Assistant (RA)
  • 2007/04 - 2008/03 Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Japan Research Assistant (RA)
  • 2005/06 - 2007/03 Hokkaido University Institute of Low Temperature Science (Graduate School of Environmental Science) The 21st COE Research Assistant (RA)

Education

  • 2005/04 - 2008/03  Hokkaido University  Graduate School of Environmental Science  Division of Earth System Science
  • 2003/04 - 2005/03  Hokkaido University  Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science  Division of Geoscience
  • 1999/04 - 2003/03  Hirosaki University  Faculty of Science and Technology  Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Association Memberships

  • JAPAN SOCIETY FOR ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT   THE JAPANESE SOCIETY OF SNOW AND ICE   International Glaciological Society   American Geophysical Union   JAPAN GEOSCIENCE UNION   METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN   International Glaciological Society   

Research Activities

Published Papers

  • Kaneyasu, N., K. Matsumoto, T. Yamaguchi, I. Noguchi, N. Murao, T. J. Yasunari, F. Ikemori
    Sci. Rep. Springer Nature 10 (4520) 2020/03 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    産総研と北大による共同プレスリリース: 産総研プレスリリース: http://bit.ly/2IUBnSn 北大プレスリリース: http://bit.ly/392j1JI
  • Hock, R., et al., (one of the contributing authors, T. J. Yasunari)
    IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate IPCC 131 - 202 2019/09 [Refereed][Invited]
  • Lau, W. K. M, J. Sang, M. K. Kim, K. M. Kim, R. D. Koster, T. J. Yasunari
    J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. 123 8441 - 8461 2018/07 [Refereed][Not invited]
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M, da Silva, M. Hayasaki, M. Akiyama, N. Murao
    Sci. Rep. 8 (6413) 2018/04 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    The press release by Hokkaido University is available here: https://goo.gl/7Hke31.
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Masashi Niwano, Yasushi Fujiyoshi, Atsushi Shimizu, Masamitsu Hayasaki, Teruo Aoki, Arlindo M. da Silva, Brent N. Holben, Sumito Matoba, Naoto Murao, Sadamu Yamagata, Kyu-Myong Kim
    SOLA 13 96 - 101 1349-6476 2017 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    Monitoring particulate matter is essential to alert the public about health risks. The Terra/MODIS true color image clearly captured a yellow band over Hokkaido prefecture in Japan on 7 March 2016. We investigated whether this event was an Asian dust (Kosa) transport or not with the ground-based observations in Sapporo and Takikawa in Hokkaido and NASA's MERRA-2 re-analysis data. The timing of increased particle number concentrations (PNCs; greater than 0.5 mu m) was clearly measured by a low-cost aerosol sensor at Sapporo and Takikawa in the early afternoon. For this particle size range, the PNC by this aerosol sensor had greater agreement with another commercial instrument for the 1-hourly mean data. The lidar data at Takikawa and NASA's AERONET at Sapporo also implied the increased dust particles (i.e., dominance of non-spherical and coarse particles, respectively), which supported that the PNC increase was due to the dust transport. The hourly PM2.5 data in Sapporo significantly increased in the evening rather than around the noon to early afternoon. We concluded that this event was judged as an Asian dust (Kosa) event in Hokkaido starting from the early afternoon, which was, however, not reported by Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) based on their visible observations.
  • Yasunari, T. J, N. Kaneyasu, A. Noda, B. Hoshino, I. Noguchi, N. Murao, M. Akiyama, M. Fujioka, K. Baba, K. Hagiwara, K. Kai, T. Yamaguchi, H. Suzuki, R. Matsumoto
    Saihyou 62 3 - 42 2016 [Not refereed][Not invited]
  • Yasunari, Teppei J., Colarco, Peter R., Lau, William K. M., Osada, Kazuo, Kido, Mizuka, Mahanama, Sarith P. P., Kim, Kyu-Myong, da Silva, Arlindo M.
    Atmospheric Research 167 298 - 313 2016 [Refereed][Not invited]
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Randal D. Koster, William K. M. Lau, Kyu-Myong Kim
    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES 120 (11) 5485 - 5503 2169-897X 2015/06 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    Dust, black carbon (BC), and organic carbon (OC) aerosols, when deposited onto snow, are known to reduce the albedo of the snow (i.e., snow darkening effect (SDE)). Here using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) with aerosol tracers and a state-of-the-art snow darkening module (GOddard SnoW Impurity Module: GOSWIM) for the land surface, we examine the role of SDE on climate in the boreal spring snowmelt season. SDE is found to produce significant surface warming (over 15Wm(-2)) over broad areas in midlatitudes, with dust being the most important contributor to the warming in central Asia and the western Himalayas and with BC having larger impact in the Europe, eastern Himalayas, East Asia, and North America. The contribution of OC to the warming is generally low but still significant mainly over southeastern Siberia, northeastern East Asia, and western Canada (similar to 19% of the total solar visible absorption by these snow impurities). The simulations suggest that SDE strengthens the boreal spring water cycle in East Asia through water recycling and moisture advection from the ocean and contributes to the maintenance of dry conditions in parts of a region spanning Europe to central Asia, partially through feedback on the model's background climatology. Overall, our study suggests that the existence of SDE in the Earth system associated with dust, BC, and OC contributes significantly to enhanced surface warming over continents in northern hemisphere midlatitudes during boreal spring, raising the surface skin temperature by approximately 3-6K near the snowline.
  • Yun Qian, Teppei J. Yasunari, Sarah J. Doherty, Mark G. Flanner, William K. M. Lau, Ming Jing, Hailong Wang, Mo Wang, Stephen G. Warren, Rudong Zhang
    ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 32 (1) 64 - 91 0256-1530 2015/01 [Refereed][Invited]
     
    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, and climatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, K. -M. Lau, Sarith P. P. Mahanama, Peter R. Colarco, Arlindo M. da Silva, Teruo Aoki, Kazuma Aoki, Naoto Murao, Sadamu Yamagata, Yuji Kodama
    SOLA 10 50 - 56 1349-6476 2014 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    The snow darkening module evaluating dust, black carbon (BC), and organic carbon (OC) depositions on the mass of snow impurities and albedo has been developed for the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth System Model, as the GOddard SnoW Impurity Module (GOSWIM). GOSWIM consists of the updated snow albedo scheme from a previous study (Yasunari et al. 2011) and a newly developed mass concentration calculation scheme, directly using aerosol depositions from the chemical transport model (GOCART) in GEOS-5. Compared to observations at Sapporo, the off-line simulations, forced by observation-based meteorology and aerosol depositions from GOES-5, reasonably simulated the seasonal migration of snow depth, albedos, and impurities of dust, BC, and OC in the snow surface. However, the simulated dust and BC mass concentrations in snow were especially underestimated except for the BC in the early winter, compared to the observations. Increasing the deposition rates of dust and BC could explain the observations. Removing BC deposition could possibly lead to an extension of snow cover duration in Sapporo of four days. Comparing the offline GOSWIM and the GEOS-5 global simulations, we found that determining better local precipitation and deposition rates of the aerosols are key factors in generating better GOSWIM snow darkening simulation in NASA GEOS-5.
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Qian Tan, K. -M. Lau, Paolo Bonasoni, Angela Marinoni, Paolo Laj, Martin Menegoz, Toshihiko Takemura, Mian Chin
    ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT 78 259 - 267 1352-2310 2013/10 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    One of the major factors attributed to the accelerated melting of Himalayan glaciers is the snow darkening effect of atmospheric black carbon (BC). The BC is the result of incomplete fossil fuel combustion from sources such as open biomass burning and wood burning cooking stoves. One of the key challenges in determining the darkening effect is the estimation uncertainty of BC deposition (BCD) rate on surface snow cover. Here we analyze the variation of BC dry deposition in seven different estimates based on different dry deposition methods which include different atmospheric forcings (observations and global model outputs) and different spatial resolutions. The seven simulations are used to estimate the uncertainty range of BC dry deposition over the southern Himalayas during pre-monsoon period (March-May) in 2006. Our results show BC dry deposition rates in a wide range of 270-4700 mu g m(-2) during the period. Two global models generate higher BC dry deposition rates due to modeled stronger surface wind and simplification of complicated sub-grid surface conditions in this region. Using ice surface roughness and observation-based meteorological data, we estimate a better range of BC dry deposition rate of 900-1300 mu g m(-2). Under dry and highly polluted conditions, aged snow and sulfate-coated BC are expected to possibly reduce visible albedo by 4.2-5.1%. Our results suggest that for estimating aerosol-induced snow darkening effects of Himalaya snowpacks using global and regional models, realistic physical representation of ice or snow surface roughness and surface wind speed are critical in reducing uncertainties on the estimate of BC deposition over snow surface. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Ritesh Gautam, N. Christina Hsu, William K.-M. Lau, Teppei J. Yasunari
    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 40 (5) 988 - 993 0094-8276 2013/03 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    The optically thick aerosol layer along the southern edge of the Himalaya has been subject of several recent investigations relating to its radiative impacts on the South Asian summer monsoon and regional climate forcing. Prior to the onset of summer monsoon, mineral dust from southwest Asian deserts is transported over the Himalayan foothills on an annual basis. Episodic dust plumes are also advected over the Himalaya, visible as dust-laden snow surface in satellite imagery, particularly in western Himalaya. We examined spectral surface reflectance retrieved from spaceborne MODIS observations that show characteristic reduction in the visible wavelengths (0.47 mu m) over western Himalaya, associated with dust-induced solar absorption. Case studies as well as seasonal variations of reflectance indicate a significant gradient across the visible (0.47 mu m) to near-infrared (0.86 mu m) spectrum (VIS-NIR), during premonsoon period. Enhanced absorption at shorter visible wavelengths and the resulting VIS-NIR gradient is consistent with model calculations of snow reflectance with dust impurity. While the role of black carbon in snow cannot be ruled out, our satellite-based analysis suggests the observed spectral reflectance gradient dominated by dust-induced solar absorption during premonsoon season. From an observational viewpoint, this study underscores the importance of mineral dust deposition toward darkening of the western Himalayan snow cover, with potential implications to accelerated seasonal snowmelt and regional snow albedo feedbacks.
  • A. Stohl, P. Seibert, G. Wotawa, D. Arnold, J. F. Burkhart, S. Eckhardt, C. Tapia, A. Vargas, T. J. Yasunari
    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 12 (5) 2313 - 2343 1680-7316 2012 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    On 11 March 2011, an earthquake occurred about 130 km off the Pacific coast of Japan's main island Honshu, followed by a large tsunami. The resulting loss of electric power at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant developed into a disaster causing massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. In this study, we determine the emissions into the atmosphere of two isotopes, the noble gas xenon-133 (Xe-133) and the aerosol-bound caesium-137 (Cs-137), which have very different release characteristics as well as behavior in the atmosphere. To determine radionuclide emissions as a function of height and time until 20 April, we made a first guess of release rates based on fuel inventories and documented accident events at the site. This first guess was subsequently improved by inverse modeling, which combined it with the results of an atmospheric transport model, FLEXPART, and measurement data from several dozen stations in Japan, North America and other regions. We used both atmospheric activity concentration measurements as well as, for Cs-137, measurements of bulk deposition. Regarding Xe-133, we find a total release of 15.3 (uncertainty range 12.2-18.3) EBq, which is more than twice as high as the total release from Chernobyl and likely the largest radioactive noble gas release in history. The entire noble gas inventory of reactor units 1-3 was set free into the atmosphere between 11 and 15 March 2011. In fact, our release estimate is higher than the entire estimated Xe-133 inventory of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which we explain with the decay of iodine-133 (half-life of 20.8 h) into Xe-133. There is strong evidence that the Xe-133 release started before the first active venting was made, possibly indicating structural damage to reactor components and/or leaks due to overpressure which would have allowed early release of noble gases. For Cs-137, the inversion results give a total emission of 36.6 (20.1-53.1) PBq, or about 43% of the estimated Chernobyl emission. Our results indicate that Cs-137 emissions peaked on 14-15 March but were generally high from 12 until 19 March, when they suddenly dropped by orders of magnitude at the time when spraying of water on the spent-fuel pool of unit 4 started. This indicates that emissions may not have originated only from the damaged reactor cores, but also from the spent-fuel pool of unit 4. This would also confirm that the spraying was an effective countermeasure. We explore the main dispersion and deposition patterns of the radioactive cloud, both regionally for Japan as well as for the entire Northern Hemisphere. While at first sight it seemed fortunate that westerly winds prevailed most of the time during the accident, a different picture emerges from our detailed analysis. Exactly during and following the period of the strongest Cs-137 emissions on 14 and 15 March as well as after another period with strong emissions on 19 March, the radioactive plume was advected over Eastern Honshu Island, where precipitation deposited a large fraction of Cs-137 on land surfaces. Radioactive clouds reached North America on 15 March and Europe on 22 March. By middle of April, Xe-133 was fairly uniformly distributed in the middle latitudes of the entire Northern Hemisphere and was for the first time also measured in the Southern Hemisphere (Darwin station, Australia). In general, simulated and observed concentrations of Xe-133 and Cs-137 both a Japanese as well as at remote sites were in good quantitative agreement. Altogether, we estimate that 6.4 PBq of Cs-137, or 18% of the total fallout until 20 April, were deposited over Japanese land areas, while most of the rest fell over the North Pacific Ocean. Only 0.7 PBq, or 1.9% of the total fallout were deposited on land areas other than Japan.
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Andreas Stohl, Ryugo S. Hayano, John F. Burkhart, Sabine Eckhardt, Tetsuzo Yasunari
    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 108 (49) 19530 - 19534 0027-8424 2011/12 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    The largest concern on the cesium-137 ((137)Cs) deposition and its soil contamination due to the emission from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) showed up after a massive quake on March 11, 2011. Cesium-137 ((137)Cs) with a half-life of 30.1 y causes the largest concerns because of its deleterious effect on agriculture and stock farming, and, thus, human life for decades. Removal of (137)Cs contaminated soils or land use limitations in areas where removal is not possible is, therefore, an urgent issue. A challenge lies in the fact that estimates of (137)Cs emissions from the Fukushima NPP are extremely uncertain, therefore, the distribution of (137)Cs in the environment is poorly constrained. Here, we estimate total (137)Cs deposition by integrating daily observations of (137)Cs deposition in each prefecture in Japan with relative deposition distribution patterns from a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, FLEXPART. We show that (137)Cs strongly contaminated the soils in large areas of eastern and northeastern Japan, whereas western Japan was sheltered by mountain ranges. The soils around Fukushima NPP and neighboring prefectures have been extensively contaminated with depositions of more than 100,000 and 10,000 MBq km(-2), respectively. Total (137)Cs depositions over two domains: (i) the Japan Islands and the surrounding ocean (130-150 degrees E and 30-46 degrees N) and, (ii) the Japan Islands, were estimated to be more than 5.6 and 1.0 PBq, respectively. We hope our (137)Cs deposition maps will help to coordinate decontamination efforts and plan regulatory measures in Japan.
  • Yasunari, T. J, R. D. Koster, K.-M. Lau, Te. Aoki, Y. C. Sud, T. Yamazaki, H. Motoyoshi, Y. Kodama
    J. Geophys. Res. 116 (D2) D02210  0148-0227 2011/01 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    (Also see the correction published in 2012: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2012/2012JD018691.shtml)
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Randal D. Koster, K. -M. Lau, Teruo Aoki, Yogesh C. Sud, Takeshi Yamazaki, Hiroki Motoyoshi, Yuji Kodama
    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES 116 D02210  2169-897X 2011/01 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003-2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.
  • T. J. Yasunari, P. Bonasoni, P. Laj, K. Fujita, E. Vuillermoz, A. Marinoni, P. Cristofanelli, R. Duchi, G. Tartari, K. -M. Lau
    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 10 (14) 6603 - 6615 1680-7316 2010 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    The possible minimal range of reduction in snow surface albedo due to dry deposition of black carbon (BC) in the pre-monsoon period (March-May) was estimated as a lower bound together with the estimation of its accuracy, based on atmospheric observations at the Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (NCO-P) sited at 5079 m a.s.l. in the Himalayan region. A total BC deposition rate was estimated as 2.89 mu g m(-2) day(-1) providing a total deposition of 266 mu g m(-2) for March-May at the site, based on a calculation with a minimal deposition velocity of 1.0x10(-4) ms(-1) with atmospheric data of equivalent BC concentration. Main BC size at NCO-P site was determined as 103.1-669.8 nm by correlation analyses between equivalent BC concentration and particulate size distributions in the atmosphere. The BC deposition from the size distribution data was also estimated. It was found that 8.7% of the estimated dry deposition corresponds to the estimated BC deposition from equivalent BC concentration data. If all the BC is deposited uniformly on the top 2-cm pure snow, the corresponding BC concentration is 26.0-68.2 mu g kg(-1), assuming snow density variations of 195-512 kg m(-3) of Yala Glacier close to NCO-P site. Such a concentration of BC in snow could result in 2.0-5.2% albedo reductions. By assuming these albedo reductions continue throughout the year, and then applying simple numerical experiments with a glacier mass balance model, we estimated reductions would lead to runoff increases of 70-204 mm of water. This runoff is the equivalent of 11.6-33.9% of the annual discharge of a typical Tibetan glacier. Our estimates of BC concentration in snow surface for pre-monsoon season is comparable to those at similar altitudes in the Himalayan region, where glaciers and perpetual snow regions begin, in the vicinity of NCO-P. Our estimates from only BC are likely to represent a lower bound for snow albedo reductions, because we used a fixed slower deposition velocity. In addition, we excluded the effects of atmospheric wind and turbulence, snow aging, dust deposition, and snow albedo feedbacks. This preliminary study represents the first investigation of BC deposition and related albedo on snow, using atmospheric aerosol data observed at the southern slope in the Himalayas.
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Koji Yamazaki
    ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT 43 (16) 2582 - 2590 1352-2310 2009/05 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    The relation of interannual connection between Asian dust outbreaks and stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) in spring was suggested by the dust and tritium variations in the Mount Wrangell ice core, Alaska in [Yasunari, T.J., Shiraiwa, T., Kanamori, S., Fujii, Y., Igarashi, M., Yamazaki, K., Benson, C.S., Hondoh, T., 2007. Intra-annual variations in atmospheric dust and tritium in the North Pacific region detected from an ice core from Mount Wrangell, Alaska. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10208. doi: 10.1029/2006JD00812]. However, these impacts on the ice core site in each event scale have not been investigated. Hence, the present paper focuses on the material transport and deposition processes for further understanding these impacts oil the ice core. The variations in dust and tritium concentrations in spring in an ice core taken at Mt. Wrangell, Alaska are explained by meteorological analysis and simulation of trajectories associated with Asian dust outbreaks and STT. Material transport and deposition at Mt. Wrangell are examined in two contrasting years (2001 and 2002). Dust and tritium concentrations both reached peak values in the early spring of 2002, while the dust peak occurred in early spring and the tritium peak occurred in late spring in 2001. Six severe East Asian transpacific dust storms over this period are modeled by forward trajectory and meteorologically analyzed. It is found that 5 of 6 events contributed to the ice Core record in Alaska. Stratospheric air is also transported to the ice core site in most cases. Tritium deposition is found to have been suppressed in the cases of the 2001 dust Storms due to lack of snowfall at appropriate times. Taken the detailed transport and deposition processes after the severe dust storms with atmospheric circulations into account, we call well explain spring dust and tritium variations in the Mount Wrangell ice core. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Koji Yamazaki
    SOLA 5 77 - 80 1349-6476 2009 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    Simulations of 10-day backward trajectories of air masses from Mount Wrangell, an Alaskan ice core site, were calculated for 11 years on a daily basis. Results were analyzed statistically in order to interpret monthly air mass contributions over the ice core site and to discuss implications for ice core studies in the North Pacific Region (NPR). Increases in tropospheric air mass transport from EA in spring suggest favorable transport conditions for Asian dust during this season. The stratospheric air mass (< 300 hPa) over the ice core site increases in winter and that from East Asia (EA) to the North Pacific Ocean in late spring. The tritium peaks observed in the ice core in late spring were discussed in the context of the present results with two possibilities on the time lag of tritium transportation in the stratosphere and the seasonal variations of water vapor amount in the troposphere. Increases in air masses originating from Siberia, Alaska and Canada in summer-fall favor the transport of black carbon due to forest fires over the ice core site. These results allow advanced interpretation of the origin and transport processes of materials in the ice core proxies in the NPR.
  • Teruo Aoki, Masahiro Hori, Hiroki Motoyoshi, Tomonori Tanikawa, Akihiro Hachikubo, Konosuke Sugiura, Teppel J. Yasunari, Rune Storvold, Hans A. Eide, Knut Stamnes, Wei Li, Jens Nieke, Yukinori Nakajima, Fumihiro Takahashi
    REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT 111 (2-3) 274 - 290 0034-4257 2007/11 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    For the validation of snow/ice products of the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-II/Global Imager (ADEOS-II/GLI), several field campaigns were performed for various types of snow conditions with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and GLI overpasses at four sites in Alaska and eastern Hokkaido, Japan from 2001 to 2005. The target satellite-derived snow parameters are snow surface temperature, mass fraction of soot, and two types of snow grain size retrieved from different spectral channels. The retrieved satellite products were compared with in-situ measured snow parameters based on snow pit work and snow sampling. The satellite-derived snow surface temperatures agreed well with in-situ measured values with a correlation coefficient (R-c) of 0.900 and a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.1 K. The satellite-derived mass fractions of soot were close to in-situ measured mass fractions of snow impurities for the snow layer between the surface and down to 7 or 10 cm rather than between 0 and 2 cm, while the satellite-derived absolute values were lower than the in-situ measured ones (R-c=0.506 and RMSE=5.0 parts per million by weight (ppmw)). This discrepancy is due primarily to the difference in the composition of snow impurities assumed in the satellite algorithm (soot) and measured in-situ (mineral dust) suggesting that the satellite retrieval of soot is not producing soot concentrations in many cases but rather dust. Snow grain sizes retrieved from two satellite channels lambda = 0.460 and 0.865 pm had better accuracy (R-c =0.840 and RMSE = 125 mu m) than those from a satellite channel at lambda = 1.64 mu m (R-c=0.524 and RMSE = 123 mu m) from the comparison with simply depth-averaged snow grain size. When similar comparisons are made with the depth-averaged measured grain size by a 1/e weighting using flux transmittance, the results for R-c and RMSE are not improved due to some difficulties in calculating the depth-averaging by a 1/e weighting. For all our satellite products, the possible causes of errors are (1) satellite sensor calibration and (2) the bidirectional reflectance model (directional emissivity model for surface temperature) used in the algorithm together with the atmospheric correction. Two ways to improve the in-situ measurements are (1) the representativeness of the measured values and (2) the measuring methods. Field measurements also indicated that the increased reflectance due to "sun crust" observed at wet snow surfaces under clear sky could cause an underestimation of satellite-derived snow grain size. This problem will be more severe for the grain size retrieved from the channel at lambda = 1.64 mu m. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    J. Geophys. Res. 112 (D10) D10208  0148-0227 2007/05 [Refereed][Not invited]
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Takayuki Shiraiwa, Syosaku Kanamori, Yoshiyuki Fujii, Makoto Igarashi, Koji Yamazaki, Carl S. Benson, Takeo Hondoh
    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES 112 (D10) 2169-897X 2007/05 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    [1] The North Pacific is subject to various seasonal climate phenomena and material circulations. Therefore intra-annual ice core data are necessary for an assessment of the climate variations. To assess past variations, a 50-m ice core was drilled at the summit of Mount Wrangell Volcano, Alaska. The dust number, tritium concentrations, and stable hydrogen isotope were analyzed. The period covered was from 1992 to 2002. We found that the concentrations of both fine dust (0.52 - 1.00 mu m), an indicator of long-range transport, and coarse dust (1.00 - 8.00 mu m) increased together every spring. Moreover, their concentrations increased drastically after 2000, corresponding to the recent increase in Asian dust outbreaks in spring. Additionally, an increase in the spring of 2001 corresponded to the largest dust storm recorded in east Asia since 1979. Therefore our findings imply that Asian dust strongly polluted Mount Wrangell every spring. The stratospheric tracer, tritium, had late spring maxima almost every year, and we found this useful for ice core dating to identify late spring in the North Pacific region. We also found that a high positive annual correlation existed between the calculated tritium and fine dust fluxes from late spring to summer. We propose that an annual relationship between the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and Asian dust storm are most closely connected in late spring because their activities are weak in summer. The Mount Wrangell ice core is important and useful for assessing the dust and tritium circulation in the distant past around the North Pacific with probable intra-annual timescale information.
  • Teruo Aoki, Hiroki Motoyoshi, Yuji Kodama, Teppei J. Yasunari, Konosuke Sugiura
    ANNALS OF GLACIOLOGY, VOL 46, 2007 46 375 - + 0260-3055 2007 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    Continuous measurements of the radiation budget and meteorological components, along with frequent snow-pit work, were performed in Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan, during two winters from 2003 to 2005. The measured relationships between broadband albedos and the mass concentration of snow impurities were compared with theoretically predicted relationships calculated using a radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-snow system in which different types (in light absorption) of impurity models based on mineral dust and soot were assumed. The result suggests that the snow in Sapporo was contaminated not only with mineral dust but also with more absorptive soot. A comparison of the measured relationships between broadband albedos and snow grain size for two different layers with the theoretically predicted relationships revealed that the visible albedo contains information about the snow grain size in deeper snow layers (10 cm), and the near-infrared albedo contains only surface information. This is due to the difference in penetration depth of solar radiation into snow between the visible and the near-infrared wavelengths.
  • M Hori, T Aoki, T Tanikawa, H Motoyoshi, A Hachikubo, K Sugiura, TJ Yasunari, H Eide, R Storvold, Y Nakajima, F Takahashi
    REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT 100 (4) 486 - 502 0034-4257 2006/02 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    The directional emissivity of snow and ice surfaces in the 8-14 mu m thermal infrared (TIR) atmospheric window was determined from spectral radiances obtained by field measurements using a portable Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in conjunction with snow pit work. The dependence of the directional ernissivity on the surface snow type (grain size and shape) was examined. We obtained emissivity spectra for five different surface types, i.e., fine dendrite snow, medium granular snow, coarse grain snow, welded sun crust snow, and smooth bare ice. The derived emissivities show a distinct spectral contrast at wavelengths lambda = 10.5-12.5 mu m which is enhanced with increasing the snow grain size. For example, emissivities at both 10.5 mu m and 12.5 mu m for the nadir angle were 0.997 and 0.984 for the fine dendrite snow, 0.996 and 0.974 for the medium granular snow, 0.995 and 0.971 for the coarse grain snow, 0.992 and 0.968 for the sun crust, and 0.993 and 0.949 for the bare ice, respectively. In addition, the spectral contrast exhibits a strong angular dependence, particularly for the coarser snow and bare ice, e.g., the emissivity lambda = 12.5 mu m for the off-nadir angle of 75 degrees reaches down to 0.927, 0.896, and 0.709 for the coarse grain snow, sun crust, and bare ice cases, respectively. The angular dependent emissivity spectra of the bare ice were quite consistent with the spectra predicted by the Fresnel reflectance theory. The observed results firmly demonstrate that the directional emissivity of snow in the TIR can vary depending upon the surface snow type. The high variability of the spectral emissivity of snow also suggests the possibility to discriminate between snow and ice types from space using the brightness temperature difference in the atmospheric window. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Teruo Aoki, Hiroki Motoyoshi, Yuji Kodama, Teppei J. Yasunari, Konosuke Sugiura, Hiroshi Kobayashi
    SOLA 2 13 - 16 1349-6476 2006 [Refereed][Not invited]
     
    This paper investigated how atmospheric aerosol deposition into snowpack affects snow albedo reduction using radiation budget observation, atmospheric aerosol monitoring, and snow pit work during the winter of 2003/2004 in Sapporo, Japan. The mass concentration of snow impurities was less than 10 parts per million by weight (ppmw) in the core accumulation season and exceeded 100 ppmw in the melting season due to a heavy dust event on March 11 to 12, 2004. The relationship between the visible albedo and snow impurities suggested the considerable effect of snow impurities in reducing the visible albedo even during the accumulation season in Sapporo. After the dust event, high impurity concentrations of approximately 600 ppmw in the top snow layer were maintained, but the visible albedo still decreased because the increasing snow grain size continued to reduce the visible albedo. The size distribution of snow impurities measured from a snow sample with a Coulter counter during the dust event was compared with the size distributions of snow impurities calculated as wet and dry depositions from a laser optical particle counter for atmospheric aerosols. The result confirmed that the contribution from wet depositions was important except for giant particles with a radius larger than 2.5 mu m.

Books etc

  • Weather keyword encyclopedia for better understanding news and weather forecasts (translated in English)
    Fudeyasu, H, T. Yamazaki, D. Hotta, Y. Kamae, Y. Ohashi, T. Nakamura, R. Yoshida, K. Shimose, T. J. Yasunari (Joint work"Impact of air pollution", "PM2.5", and "Wildfire")
    Beret Publishing Co., Ltd. 2019/10 (ISBN: 9784860645915) 276 116–119, 134–138, and 139–143
  • A review of causes of wildfire occurrences in/around Siberia and their air pollution impacts on remote places, and future plans of PM2.5 measurements in Russia
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M. da Silva, Y. Matsumi (Joint workIn Natural hazards, modern environmental risks and ecosystem resilience: VII Druzhinin’s Readings: the Scientific Conference Proceedings)
    Khabarovsk OOO Omega-Press 2018/10 (ISBN: 9785906575098) 450 135-138
  • 英文科学絵本翻訳「ほら あめだ!」(Down Comes The Rain,原著Franklyn M. Branley)
    安成哲平 (Single translation)
    福音館書店 2009/04 (ISBN: 9784834023602)

Conference Activities & Talks

  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Kyu-Myong Kim, Hisashi Nakamura, Nakbin Choi, Myong-In Lee, Yoshihiro Tachibana, Yutaka Matsumi, Shigeto Wakabayashi, Arlindo M da Silva
    JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2020: Virtual  2020/07  Virtual  Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU) & American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • Teppei J. Yasunari, Shigeto Wakabayashi, Toshihiko Takemura, Daiju Narita
    JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2020: Virtual  2020/07  Virtual  Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU) & American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • Yasunari, T. J., Y. Matsumi, S. Wakabayashi, K.-M. Kim, B. N. Holben, A. Shimizu, A. M. da Silva, S. Matoba
    Chozen International Symposium on Transboundary Pollution at North-South Transect at Marginal Sea in western Pacific Ocean  2019/12  Kanazawa, Japan  Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University
  • Yasunari, T. J, T. Takemura
    AGU Fall Meeting 2019  2019/12  San Francisco, CA, USA  American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • MIROC/SPRINTARSを使ったシベリア森林火災の現在気候・将来気候への影響解析とMATSIROアップデート状況報告  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Takemura, D. Narita, K.-M. Kim, R. O’ishi, K. Takata, T. Watanabe, T. Nitta
    2019年度 第1回 次世代陸モデル開発・応用・社会実装に関する合同ワークショップ  2019/10
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, Y. Matsumi, I. Takigawa, A. M. da Silva
    The 2nd Japan-American-German Frontiers of Science (JAGFoS) Symposium  2019/09  Kyoto  JSPS, National Academy of Science (NAS), and Alexander von Humboldt (AvH)
  • T.J. Yasunari, T. Takemura, K.M. Kim
    27th IUGG General Assembly  2019/07  Montréal, Canada  IUGG
  • Yasunari, T. J, I. Takigawa, K.-M. Kim, A. da Silva
    JpGU Meeting 2019  2019/05  Chiba, Japan  Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)
  • Teppei J. Yasunari
    The 26th Sanitation Engineering Symposium (in Japanese)  2018/11  Hokkaido University  Committee of Sanitation Engineering Symposium
  • Observed increased PM2.5 in Sapporo on April 27, 2018, due to smoke transports from East Eurasia (presented in Japanese)  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, Y. Matsumi, M. Hayasaki, A. Shimizu, K.-M. Kim, B. Holben, A. M. da Silva
    Announcement of the 2018 Autumn Meeting  2018/10
  • A review of causes of wildfire occurrences in/around Siberia and their air pollution impacts on remote places, and future plans of PM2.5 measurements in Russia  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M. da Silva, Y. Matsumi
    All-Russian conference with international participation dedicated to the 50th anniversary of the Institute of Water and Ecology Problems, FEB RAS: Natural hazards, modern environmental risks and ecosystem resilience  2018/10  Khabarovsk  Institute of Water and Ecology Problems (IWEP), Far Eastern Branch (FEB) of the Russian Academy of Science (RAS)
  • Teppei J. Yasunari
    Robust BOSAI Symposium  2018/09  Hokkaido University  Hokkaido University and Research Development Platform for Robust Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Industry
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M. da Silva
    AOGS 15th Annual Meeting  2018/06  Honolulu, HI, USA  Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS)
  • Yasunari, T. J, K. Ishii, M. Akiyama, T. Yamaguchi, K.-M. Kim, A. M da Silva, S. Matoba, N. Murao
    JpGU Meeting 2018  2018/05  Chiba, Japan  Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)
  • Yasunari, T. J, S. Namiki, K. Sera, M. Akiyama, S. Matoba, N. Murao
    第24回NMCC共同利用研究成果発表会  2018/05  Morioka, Iwate, Japan  Nishina Memorial Cyclotron Center (NMCC), Japan Radioisotope Association
  • 人生100年時代をどう生きるか?-研究者の例-  [Invited]
    Teppei J. Yasunari
    平成30年度北海道大学大学院環境科学院前期講義・環境科学総論(担当山中康裕教授)・3日目午後(大学院からの人生設計)ゲスト講演  2018/04
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M, da Silva, M. Hayasaki, M. Akiyama, N. Murao
    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) US Alumni 2018 Seminar on "Growing Atmospheric Pollution and Its Impact on Climate"  2018/02  Orange County, CA, USA  Chapman University
  • 積雪融解時のダスト・ブラックカーボンの流出効率算出のための実験的研究  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, S. Takahashi, M. Akiyama, S. Matoba
    The 2nd SIGMA-II Workshop  2018/02  Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan  Meteorological Research Institute
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M da Silva
    Fifth International Symposium on Arctic Research (ISAR-5)  2018/01  Tokyo  Japan Consortium for Arctic Environmental Research (JCAR)
  • Intra- and Inter- annual PM2.5 variations in the Arctic region during 2003-2017 based on the NASA’s MERRA-2 re-analysis data  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M da Silva
    AGU Fall Meeting 2017  2017/12  New Orleans, LA, USA  American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • 積雪中のダスト・ブラックカーボン・オーガニックカーボン濃度の簡易的測定手法の検討  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 外崎友望, 秋山雅行, 的場澄人, 青木輝夫, 庭野匡思, 谷川朋範, 村尾直人
    日本気象学会2017年度秋季大会  2017/10
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, W. K.-M. Lau, S. P, P. Mahanama, J. Sang, M.-K. Kim, R. D. Koster
    The Third Workshop on Atmospheric Composition and the Asian Monsoon (ACAM)  2017/06  Guangzhou, China
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. da Silva
    JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2017  2017/05  Chiba, Japan  JpGU and AGU
  • MATSIRO SNow and Impurity Module (MATSNIM) 構想について  [Not invited]
    Teppei J. Yasunari
    2016年度GCM検討会  2017/03  Okayama
  • Transports of biomass burning smokes from Eastern Eurasia to Hokkaido, Japan, and the causes of the fires  [Not invited]
    Teppei J. Yasunari
    The J-ARC Net Lab Winter School Program 2017  2017/03  Yakutsk, the Sakha Republic  Japan Arctic Research Network Center (J-ARC Net )
  • 積雪汚染モデルの改善計画  [Not invited]
    Teppei J. Yasunari
    2016年度第二回次世代陸モデル開発検討会  2017/01
  • Teppei J. Yasunari
    Climate & Radiation Laboratory Seminar Series  2016/12  Greenbelt, MD, USA  Code 613, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Yasunari, T. J, A. da Silva, M. Akiyama, M. Hayasaki, N. Murao, K.-M. Kim
    AGU Fall Meeting 2016  2016/12  San Francisco, CA, USA  American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • Teppei J. Yasunari
    第4回大気エアロゾルシンポジウム-ブラックカーボン-  2016/11  かでる2.7(札幌市中央区北2条西7丁目)710号会議室  (地独)北海道立総合研究機構環境科学研究センター、酪農学園大学
  • MIROC の陸面モデルの今後の開発予定及 びフィルター分析手法のグリーンランドへの応用  [Not invited]
    Teppei J. Yasunari
    Post-SIGMA Kick-off Workshop in Okayama  2016/09
  • An identified Asian dust transport to Hokkaido in the spring of 2016  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, Y. Fujiyoshi, M. Niwano, A. Shimizu, M. Hayasaki, T. Aoki, A. M, da Silva, B. N. Holben, N. Murao, S. Yamagata, K.-M. Kim
    The 57th meeting of the Japan Society for Atmospheric Environment  2016/09
  • What do you expect for Nitobe School?  [Invited]
    Teppei J. Yasunari
    FY2016 Entrance Ceremony of Nitobe School  2016/05
  • Teppei J. Yasunari
    2015年GCM検討会  2015/12  Tokyo  University of Tokyo
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M. da Silva
    The Sixth Symposium on Polar Science  2015/11  Tokyo (Tachikawa)  National Institute of Polar Research
  • Teppei J. Yasunari
    低温研セミナー  2015/10  Sapporo  Institute of Low Temperature Science (ILTS), Hokkaido University
  • Climatological and daily characteristics of the July 2014 Siberian smoke with the MERRAero aerosol reanalysis product  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Kim, A. M. da Silva, M. Akiyama, N. Murao
    The 2015 Autumn Meeting of Meteorological Society of Japan  2015/10  Kyoto  Meteorological Society of Japan
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, K.-M. Kim, R. D. Koster
    AGU Fall Meeting 2014  2014/12  San Francisco, CA, USA  American Geophysical Union
  • Atmospheric responses caused by snow darkening effect over Eurasia from spring to summer  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, K.-M. Kim, R. D. Koster
    The 2014 Autumn Meeting of Meteorological Society of Japan  2014/10  Fukuoka, Japan  Meteorological Society of Japan
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, K.-M. Kim, R. D. Koster, Y. Qian
    Workshop on Perspectives in Computational Climate Science and 7th OFES International Workshop  2014/10  Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima, Japan  The University of Tokyo (Japan), The University of Aizu (Japan), IPRC (USA), and JAMSTEC-APL (Japan)
  • Up-to-date summary of the GOddard SnoW Impurity Module (GOSWIM) for the NASA GEOS-5 Model  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, S. P, P. Mahanama, P. R. Colarco, A. M, da Silva, T. Aoki, K. Aoki, N. Murao, S. Yamagata, Y. Kodama, R. D. Koster
    2014 Young Scientist Forum (Internal Forum at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)  2014/06
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, S. P, P. Mahanama, P. R. Colarco, R. D. Koster, K.-M. Kim, A. da Silva
    AGU Fall Meeting 2013  2013/12  San Francisco, CA, USA  American Geophysical Union
  • Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, S. P, P. Mahanama, P. R. Colarco, R. D. Koster, K.-M. Kim, A. M. da Silva
    The 2013 Autumn Meeting of Meteorological Society of Japan  2013/11  Sendai, Japan  Meteorological Society of Japan
  • Yasunari, T. J, P. R. Colarco, K.-M. Lau, K. Osada, M. Kido, S. P, P. Mahanama, K.-M. Kim, A. M. da Silva
    The 2013 Autumn Meeting of Meteorological Society of Japan  2013/11  Sendai, Japan  Meteorological Society of Japan
  • Introduction of the Goddard Snow Darkening Package for the NASA GEOS-5  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, S. P, P. Mahanama, R. D. Koster, M. Suarez, P. R. Colarco, A. da Silva, T. Aoki, Y. Kodama
    Young Scientist Forum (Internal forum at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)  2013/06
  • Yasunari, T. J
    Climate & Radiation Laboratory Seminar Series, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD, USA  2012/10
  • Performance tests of snow-related variables over the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas using a new version of NASA GEOS-5 land surface model that includes the snow darkening effect  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, R. D. Koster, M. Suarez, S. P, P. Mahanama, A. M. da Silva, P. R. Colarco
    AGU Fall Meeting 2011, San Francisco, CA, USA  2011/12
  • 全球予報モデルGEOS-5への積雪不純物・アルベドモデルの導入とヒマラヤ氷河への影響  [Not invited]
    安成哲平
    国立極地研究所気水圏コロキ,東京  2011/12
  • Mass concentrations of dust, black carbon, and organic carbon in snow directly estimated from the NASA GOCART/GEOS-5 aerosol model  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, R. D. Koster, K.-M. Lau, P. R. Colarco, A. M, da Silva, Te. Aoki, Y. Kodama
    日本気象学会2011年度秋季大会、名古屋  2011/11
  • Preliminary simulations focusing on snow cover fraction over the Tibetan Plateau using a new version of the NASA GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K.-M. Lau, R. D. Koster, M. Suarez, S. P, P. Mahanama, A. M. da Silva, P. R. Colarco
    日本気象学会2011年度秋季大会、名古屋  2011/11
  • エアロゾルの沈着が与える様々な影響について  [Invited]
    安成哲平
    北海道大学環境科学院研究院アワー  2011/11
  • T. J. Yasunari, K.-M. Lau, R. D. Koster, M. Suarez, S. P. Mahanama, R. Gautam, K. M. Kim, A. M. Dasilva, P. R. Colarco
    Workshop on Himalayan Glaciers, Hydrology, Climate Change, and Implications for Water Security, Washington D. C., USA  2011/10
  • Snow albedo and snow impurities  [Invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, R. D. Koster, M. Suarez, K.-M. Lau, S. P, P. Mahanama, Te. Aoki, P. R. Colarco, A. M, da Silva, K.-M. Kim, Y. C. Sud, M. G. Flanner, C. S. Zender, T. Yamazaki, H. Motoyoshi, Y. Kodama
    GEOS-5 AGCM MAP Investigator Workshop, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD, USA  2011/06
  • Yasunari, T. J, P. Bonasoni, P. Laj, Q. Tan, K. Fujita, K.-M. Lau, A. Marinoni, P. Cristofanelli, T. Takemura, R. D. Koster, M. Chin, E. Vuillermoz, G. Tartari, R. Duchi
    AAAS Symposium 2011  2011/02
  • New snow albedo scheme with the influence of black carbon and dust in the NASA catchment-based land surface model  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, R. D. Koster, K.-M. Lau, Te. Aoki, Y. C. Sud, T. Yamazaki, H. Motoyoshi, Y. Kodama
    AGU Fall Meeting 2010, San Francisco, CA, USA  2010/12
  • NASA Himalayan project on absorbing aerosols  [Not invited]
    安成哲平
    国立極地研究所気水圏コロキ,東京  2010/10
  • ヒマラヤの氷河に乾性沈着するブラックカーボン量のモデル間の見積もり誤差  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, Qian Tan, Paolo Bonasoni, Angela Marinoni, Paolo Laj, Mian Chin, 竹村俊彦, K.-M. Lau
    日本気象学会2010年度秋季大会、京都  2010/10
  • ブラックカーボンとダストを考慮した積雪アルベドモデル:2003/2004 冬季札幌での検証例  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, Randal D. Koster, 山崎剛, 青木輝夫, 本吉弘岐, 兒玉裕二, Yogesh. C. Sud, K.-M. Lau
    日本気象学会2010年度秋季大会、京都  2010/10
  • A new snow albedo parameterizations for the dust and black carbon influences in the NASA catchment-based land surface model in GEOS-5  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J
    Aerocenter seminar, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD, USA  2010/09
  • Atmospheric equivalent concentration and black carbon deposition in Himalayan region during pre-monsoon season: observations at the NCO-P site and comparisons with GOCART and SPRINTARS model simulations  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, P. Bonasoni, A. Marinoni, P. Laj, M. Chin, Q. Tian, T. Takemura, K.-M. Lau
    Symposium on Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics at Mountain Sites, Interlaken, Switzerland  2010/06
  • Estimation of black carbon deposition from particulate data in the atmosphere at NCO-P site in Himalayas during pre-monsoon season and its implication to snow surface albedo reduction  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, P. Bonasoni, P. Laj, K. Fujita, E. Vuillermoz, A. Marinoni, P. Cristofanelli, F. Calzolari, R. Duchi, G. Tartari, K.-M. Lau
    AGU Fall Meeting 2009, San Francisco, CA, USA  2009/12
  • アイスコアってな~に?~黄砂と成層圏の物質を探る~  [Invited]
    安成哲平
    平成20年度中谷宇吉郎科学奨励賞受賞記念講演,加賀  2009/02
  • 北部北太平洋域の過去30年のダスト変動:2001年4月の大規模黄砂の降下量は大きい  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 白岩孝行, 的場澄人, 佐々木央岳, 東久美子
    日本気象学会2008年度秋季大会,仙台  2008/11
  • アラスカのアイスコアが語る過去30年の黄砂と成層圏対流圏輸送(STT)の情報  [Invited]
    安成哲平
    京都大学 地球惑星科学専攻 地球科学輻合部特別講演会,京都  2008/10
  • 降下物モニタリングについてのコメント「北太平洋域自由対流圏高度のダスト変動:黄砂のケーススタディから季節・経年変動まで」  [Invited]
    安成哲平, 白岩孝行, 的場澄人, 佐々木央岳
    ダストの動態解明に関する研究集会,名古屋  2008/09
  • Importance of spring cyclonic activities in East Asia on Asian dust storm and the Stratosphere-to-Troposphere transport  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, K. Yamazaki, T. Shiraiwa, T. Hondoh
    First International Conference: From Deserts to Monsoons, Crete, Greece  2008/06
  • アラスカ・ランゲル山アイスコア及び気象学的解 析から考察される春季北太平洋域のトリチウム変動のメカニズム  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 山崎孝治, 白岩孝行, 本堂武夫
    北海道大学低温科学研究所共同研究集会「環境史研究のための山岳アイスコア」,札幌  2007/12
  • 黄砂と成層圏-対流圏輸送の同時発生,及びその空気塊のアラスカ・ランゲル山への輸送:2001年4月の事例解析  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 山崎孝治, 本堂武夫
    日本気象学会2007年度秋季大会,札幌  2007/10
  • アイスコアから提示された黄砂と成層圏-対流圏輸送の同時発生の気象学的解析からの確認:2001年4月の事例解析  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 山崎孝治, 本堂武夫
    日本雪氷学会2007年度全国大会,富山  2007/09
  • Possible interannual connection in spring between Asian dust storm and the stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT), detected from Mount Wrangell ice core, Alaska  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 白岩孝行, 金森晶作, 藤井理行, 五十嵐誠, 山崎孝治, Carl S. Benson, 本堂武夫
    日本気象学会2007年度夏期特別セミナー,札幌  2007/08
  • Beautiful seasonal cycles of atmospheric dust and tritium obtained from Mount Wrangell ice core, Alaska, in the North Pacific region and comparison with statistical backward trajectory analysis  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    IUGG XXIV General Assembly, Perugia, Italy  2007/07
  • Seasonal cycles of atmospheric dust and tritium reconstructed from Mount Wrangell ice core, Alaska and comparison with statistical-backward trajectory analysis  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    Hokkaido University COE Symposium on “Prediction and Avoidance of an Abrupt Change in the Bio-Geosphere System”, Sapporo, Japan  2007/02
  • Seasonal variations of atmospheric dust and tritium from Mount Wrangell ice core, Alaska and comparison with statistical air mass trajectory analysis  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    The 2nd International Workshop on Physics of Ice Core Records (PICR-2), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan  2007/02
  • Seasonal origins of air masses transported to Mount Wrangell, Alaska, and comparison with the past atmospheric dust and tritium variations in its ice core  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    AGU Fall Meeting 2006, San Francisco, CA, USA  2006/12
  • アラスカ・ランゲル山雪氷コアが復元する北太平洋域のダスト・トリチウム季節変動及び年涵養量の経年変化  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 白岩孝行, 金森晶作, 五十嵐誠, Carl S. Benson, 藤井理行, 山崎孝治, 本堂武夫
    2006年度気水圏シンポジウム,東京  2006/12
  • 降雪によるエアロゾル粒子数の最大除去率及び表面積雪に含まれるダスト粒子数の見積もり  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 杉浦幸之助, 青木輝夫, 兒玉裕二, 本堂武夫
    日本雪氷学会2006年度全国大会,秋田  2006/11
  • アラスカ・ランゲル山へ輸送された成層圏起源トリチウムの対流圏移流時期及び交換場所の特定  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 山崎孝治, 白岩孝行, 五十嵐誠, Carl S. Benson, 金森晶作, 藤井理行, 本堂武夫
    日本気象学会2006年度秋季大会,名古屋  2006/10
  • Seasonal variations of the past atmospheric dust and tritium in the ice core of Mount Wrangell, Alaska, and of air-mass origins calculated by backward trajectory analysis  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    Hokkaido University Symposium on “Sustainable Development”, Sapporo, Japan  2006/08
  • Possible increases in tropospheric dust, tritium, and ozone over Alaska due to increasing storm activities in East Asia  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, C. S. Benson, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, T. Hondoh
    日本地球惑星科学連合2006年大会, 千葉  2006/05
  • Possible increases in tropospheric dust, tritium, and ozone in late-spring due to increasing storm activities in East Asia detected by Mount Wrangell Ice core, Alaska  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    Meeting at Institute of Low Temperature Science in Hokkaido University on "Problems and Prospects on Ice Cores Drilled at High Mountains", Sapporo, Japan  2006/02
  • Alaskan ice core shows relationship between Asian dust storm and the stratosphere troposphere exchange  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, C. S. Benson, T. Hondoh
    AGU Fall Meeting 2005, San Francisco, CA, USA  2005/12
  • アラスカ・ランゲル山へ輸送される空気塊の起源と雪氷コアデータの比較  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 白岩孝行, Carl S. Benson, 山崎孝治, 金森晶作, 藤井理行, 五十嵐誠, 本堂武夫
    日本気象学会2005年度秋季大会,神戸  2005/11
  • アラスカ・ランゲル山雪氷コアから高時間分解能で復元された過去の降雪量  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 白岩孝行, 金森晶作, 藤井理行, 五十嵐誠, 山崎孝治, Carl S. Benson, 本堂武夫
    2005年度日本雪氷学会全国大会,旭川  2005/10
  • 雪氷コア中のダスト濃度に基づく降雪量の季節配分の復元:アラスカ・ランゲル山の事例  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 白岩孝行, 金森晶作, Carl S. Benson, 山崎孝治, 藤井理行, 五十嵐誠, 本堂武夫
    気象学会2005年度春季大会,東京  2005/05
  • Dust transport, deposition and variations on Mt. Wrangell, Alaska, and their implications to material circulation  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Hondoh, T. Shiraiwa, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, C. S. Benson, S. Kanamori, K.Yamazaki
    Third International Symposium on the Arctic Research and Seventh Ny-Ålesund Scientific Seminar, Tokyo, Japan  2005/02
  • Dust Variations in the Atmosphere and Snow-Surface at the Summit of Mt. Wrangell, Alaska ~ for the Connection between Present and Past Climate Study ~  [Not invited]
    Yasunari, T. J, T. Shiraiwa, S. Kanamori, T. Hondoh, Y. Fujii, M. Igarashi, K. Yamazaki, Te. Aoki, K. Sugiura, C. S. Benson
    5th International Workshop on Global Change: Connection to the Arctic (GCCA5), Tsukuba, Japan  2004/11
  • アラスカ・ランゲル山の雪面と大気のダスト変動及びそれに基づく雪氷コアのダスト解析  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 本堂武夫, 白岩孝行, Carl S. Benson, 金森晶作, 藤井理行, 五十嵐誠, 山崎孝治, 青木輝夫, 杉浦幸之助
    日本気象学会2004年度秋季大会,福岡  2004/10
  • アラスカ・ランゲル山山頂における大気中・表層積雪中のエアロゾル・ダスト変動  [Not invited]
    安成哲平, 本堂武夫, 白岩孝行, 藤井理行, 五十嵐誠, 山崎孝治, 青木輝夫, 杉浦幸之助
    2004年度日本雪氷学会全国大会,彦根  2004/09

MISC

Awards & Honors

  • 2020/02 Hokkaido University Hokkaido University President's Award for Excellence in Research and Education for AY2019
     
    受賞者: Teppei J. Yasunari
  • 2019/08 Hokkaido University Excellent Teachers on General Education evaluated with its AY2018 questionnaire
     
    受賞者: Teppei J. Yasunari
  • 2019/04 The Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) The Young Scientists’ Prize in the Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)
     研究課題:「雪氷圏大気汚染の観測及び気候的発生要因と影響評価の研究」 
    受賞者: Teppei J. Yasunari
  • 2016/08 ESPEC Prize for the Encouragement of Environmental Studies (ESPEC CORP.)
     
    受賞者: Teppei J. Yasunari
  • 2011/01 Best First Authored Paper Award (Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA/GSFC)
     
    受賞者: Teppei J. Yasunari
  • 2009/02 Kaga city, Ishikawa prefecture The Nakaya Ukichiro Science Incentive Award
     
    受賞者: Teppei J. Yasunari
  • 2008/05 Japan Student Services Organization (JSSO) Half-exemption from repayment upon graduation for graduate school students with outstanding results
     
    受賞者: Teppei J. Yasunari

Research Grants & Projects

Educational Activities

Teaching Experience

  • Natural Environment in Hokkaido, Russian Far East and Arctic Zone: Lecture 4; Wildfire and its air pollutionNatural Environment in Hokkaido, Russian Far East and Arctic Zone: Lecture 4; Wildfire and its air pollution RJE3 Program, Hokkaido University
  • Introduction to Arctic natural and social sciences: Wildfires in the ArcticIntroduction to Arctic natural and social sciences: Wildfires in the Arctic Hokkaido Summer Institute, Hokkaido University
  • Advanced & Intermediate English Seminar (General Education Liberal Arts) [About half held in English; active learning classes included]Advanced & Intermediate English Seminar (General Education Liberal Arts) [About half held in English; active learning classes included] Hokkaido University
  • Atmospheric Environment Engineering [All held in English; active learning classes included]Atmospheric Environment Engineering [All held in English; active learning classes included] Graduate School of Engineering (e3), Hokkaido University
  • Environmental Engineering Experiments I (by some staffs)Environmental Engineering Experiments I (by some staffs) Department of Socio-Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, Hokkaido University
  • Exercise in English for Science and Technology (by some staffs)Exercise in English for Science and Technology (by some staffs) Department of Socio-Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, Hokkaido University
  • Computing Exercises (by some staffs)Computing Exercises (by some staffs) Department of Socio-Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, Hokkaido University
  • Atmospheric Environment Engineering
    開講年度 : 2018
    課程区分 : 修士課程
    開講学部 : 工学院
    キーワード : climate change, atmospheric science, atmospheric aerosols, atmospheric environment, meteorology, and air pollution
  • Atmospheric Environment Engineering
    開講年度 : 2018
    課程区分 : 博士後期課程
    開講学部 : 工学院
    キーワード : climate change, atmospheric science, atmospheric aerosols, atmospheric environment, meteorology, and air pollution
  • Environmental Engineering Laboratory I
    開講年度 : 2018
    課程区分 : 学士課程
    開講学部 : 工学部
    キーワード : 分析化学実験、環境汚染物質濃度の化学測定、酸・塩基滴定、吸光光度法、水質汚濁測定、微生物量測定
  • English Seminar
    開講年度 : 2018
    課程区分 : 学士課程
    開講学部 : 全学教育
    キーワード : 地球環境, 気候変動, 地球温暖化, アクティヴ・ラーニング, グループディスカッション, プレゼンテーション、スピーチ

Committee Membership

  • 2020/07 - Today   Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)   Specially Appointed Meeting Operations Special Administrator for the JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2020
  • 2020/07 - Today   Meteorological Society of Japan   Editorial Board of SOLA (Steering Committee Member)
  • 2018/07 - Today   Meteorological Society of Japan   Meteorological Society of Japan Committee on the Spring and Autumn Meeting Oversight
  • 2018/07 - Today   PLOS   Academic Editor of PLOS ONE
  • 2017/11 - Today   Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)   Committee member for Global Strategy Committee (Secretary)
  • 2017/09 - Today   Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)   Committee member for Diversity Management and Talent Pool (Vice-chairman)
  • 2016/06 - Today   Meteorological Society of Japan, Hokkaido Branch   Secretary
  • 2016/04 - Today   Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)   Representative
  • 2019/06 -2020/09   Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS)   Planning Group Member (PGM) of the 3rd Japanese-American-German FoS Symposium (JAGFoS) in the committee of the Frontier of Science (FoS) Symposium
  • 2019/09 -2020/05   Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)   JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2020 Program Committee
  • 2016/06 -2020/05   Meteorological Society of Japan   Editorial Board of SOLA (Editor)
  • 2019/09 -2019/09   Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS)   A participant of the 2nd Japanese-American-German FoS Symposium (JAGFoS) in the committee of the Frontier of Science (FoS) Symposium
  • 2018/08 -2019/05   Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)   JpGU 2019 Meeting Program Committee
  • 2016/06 -2017/03   Nitobe School, Hokkaido University   Mentor
  • 2015/08 -2016/03   Nitobe School, Hokkaido University   Mentor

Social Contribution

Social Contribution

Social Contribution

  • Counselor at the Career Booth
    Date (from-to) : 2019/05
    Role : Organizing member
    Sponser, Organizer, Publisher  : Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)
    Event, Program, Title : JpGU Meeting 2019
  • Counselor at the Career Booth
    Date (from-to) : 2018/05
    Role : Organizing member
    Sponser, Organizer, Publisher  : Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)
    Event, Program, Title : JpGU Meeting 2018
  • Counselor at the Career Booth
    Date (from-to) : 2017/05
    Role : Organizing member
    Sponser, Organizer, Publisher  : JpGU
    Event, Program, Title : JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2017

Media Coverage

Academic Contribution

  • Judge contributions to Outstanding Student Paper Awards (OSPA)
    Date (from-to) :2018/12
    Role: Review
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • a co-convener of the session, AS19 (Impact of Aerosols on Hydro-climate), of AOGS 15th Annual Meeting 2018
    Date (from-to) :-2018/06
    Role: Panel chair etc
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: AOGS
  • a member of executive committee for the 2017 Annual Autumn Meeting of Meteorological Society of Japan, Sapporo, Japan
    Date (from-to) :-2017/11
    Role: Planning etc
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: Meteorological Society of Japan
  • a co-convener of the session, "A-AS07: Aerosol impacts on air quality and climate", of JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting 2017
    Date (from-to) :-2017/05
    Role: Panel chair etc
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU)
  • Judge contributions to Outstanding Student Paper Awards (OSPA)
    Date (from-to) :-2016/12
    Role: Review
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • a co-convener of the session, "GC21I: Arctic Environmental Change: Local, Regional, Global Drivers and Impacts I; GC23A: Arctic Environmental Change: Local, Regional, Global Drivers and Impacts II Poster", of AGU Fall Meeting 2016
    Date (from-to) :-2016/12
    Role: Panel chair etc
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • a member of executive committee for the 57th meeting of the Japan Society for Atmospheric Environment, Sapporo, Japan
    Date (from-to) :-2016/09
    Role: Planning etc
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: Japan Society for Atmospheric Environment
  • Judge contributions to Outstanding Student Paper Awards (OSPA)
    Date (from-to) :-2014/12
    Role: Review
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • Judge contributions to Outstanding Student Paper Awards (OSPA)
    Date (from-to) :-2013/12
    Role: Review
    Type: Academic society etc
    Organizer, responsible person: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
  • Chairman (Material Circulation session) at the 2013 Annual Autumn Meeting of Meteorological Society of Japan
    Date (from-to) :-2013/11
    Role: Panel chair etc
    Type: Competition etc
    Organizer, responsible person: Meteorological Society of Japan

Others

  • 2018/01 -2019/09 Contributing Author (CA) in Chapter 2 of IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate
    See the IPCC website at: https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/chapter/chapter-2/
  • Reviewing papers (Names of international journals)
    Paper referee experiences: Advances in Climate Change Research; Annales Geophysicae; Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics; Atmospheric Environment; Earth-Science Reviews; Environmental Research Letters; Environmental Science and Pollution Research; Environmental Science & Technology; International Journal of Climatology; Journal of Glaciology; Journal of Geophysical Research; Journal of Hydrology; PLOS ONE; PNAS (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA); Science; SOLA; Tellus B; The Cryosphere


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